BookSpot
      Back to Home

What
to Read
Bestsellers
Book Awards
Book Reviews
Online Books
First Chapters
Reading Lists

Genre Corner
Children's Books
Comic Books
Mystery
Poetry
Romance
Science Fiction
Young Adult

Where to Buy
Compare Prices
Book Stores
Antique Books
Audio Books
Technical Books
Textbooks
Used Books

Behind the Books
Authors
Publishers
Literary Crit.
Discussion Grps.
Podcasts
Book Assns.
Book Events
Book Facts
Book News
Lit Magazines
For Writers
Literacy

BookSpot
About This Site


Back to Home Page




 
s
s
s
Search BookSpot or Google |   Great Must-See sites   |   Read Articles and Lists | Find answers | Did you know?  
s


Books on the Big Screen

When a novel is produced into a movie, the same debate always develops. "Which is better, the book or the movie?" Although we at BookSpot are a little partial to books, this is sometimes a tough question to answer. To help you explore the question, we have started a list of classic books that have become classic movies. These brilliantly written books have become movies worthy of their own rack at the local video store. So don't worry about which is better. Just make sure you have your library card and your video store membership card ready.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Written in 1813, Pride and Prejudice was developed into a movie in 1940. Although none of the all-star cast, including Laurence Olivier, received an Oscar nomination, the movie did win for Best Art Direction. Find out more about the movie, awards and cast at the Internet Movie Database site for Pride and Prejudice. The book itself is still very popular, along with many of Austen's other novels, including Emma and Sense and Sensibility (both of which have recently been developed as movies). Sense and Sensibility was released in 1995 and the movie Clueless has been regarded as a modern day Emma. To learn more about Jane Austen and her books, checkout the Jane Austen Homepage, complete with a bulletin board and award page. You can even read the entire novel online at the Bibliomania site.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
Still on the bestseller list 100 years after Alcott's death, Little Women is one of the most popular novels ever written. The story of four sisters and their mother who manage their home after their father leaves to fight with the confederate army during the Civil War, Little Women became a movie in 1933. Katharine Hepburn won best actress for her portrayal of Jo and the movie was nominated for Best Picture. The IMDB site for Little Women has even more information on the movie. For more information on Alcott and her other novels, don't miss The Louisa May Alcott Web. Little Women can also be read online courtesy of Bibliomania.

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
A tough battle, but the book is said to be better than the movie that won an Oscar for Best Picture in 1939. The movie starred Clark Gable as Rhett Butler and Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O'Hara. Both Gable and Leigh were nominated for Best Actor and Actress, but only Leigh was able to take a statue home. Find more about the cast at the IMBD site for the movie. Gone With the Wind is one of the most loved love stories of all time. According to many fans, the book has more interesting characters than the movie. Mitchell received a Pulitzer Prize for her book in 1937. And if you really want more on Mitchell, you can even take a Virtual Tour of her home where she wrote Gone With the Wind. (But be prepared to download a plug-in in order to see it).

Breakfast at Tiffany's by Truman Capote
The movie was made soon after the book that was published in 1958. In 1961, Audrey Hepburn played the part of Holly Golightly and was nominated for Best Actress. Although Hepburn didn't win, the movie did win two Oscars for Henry Mancini's music and score. The story of a high-priced call girl that believes "you can make yourself love anybody" was written after Capote's other major success, In Cold Blood. To find out more about Capote, check out a Web site devoted to him, Truman Capote, and also Breakfast at Tiffany's: The Novel.

Father of the Bride by Edward Streeter
This popular book written by Streeter was originally made into a movie and nominated for Best Picture in 1950 . In its 1991 re-make, Steve Martin replaced Spencer Tracy as the run-down dad who struggles with the ills and bills of his daughters wedding. Streeter's story was also developed into a television series in 1961. In 1995, Father of the Bride Part II was released starring Martin once again. For more information on all three of these movies, check out the IMDB site for Father of the Bride. Streeter was able to publish two popular books, Father of the Bride and Dere Mabel, while still maintaining a successful banking career.

For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
The popular and controversial writer's work was made into a movie in 1944 and nominated for Best Picture. The movie starred Ingrid Bergman as Maria and Gary Cooper as Robert Jordan. To find out more about these stars and the movie, check out the IMDB site for Whom the Bell Tolls. This Ernest Hemingway page is filled with good links to more Hemingway information.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
Although this film wasn't nominated for an Oscar for Best Picture, it did have and all-star cast, including Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman and Lana Turner. Learn more about them and the movie at IMDB site for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Stevenson's book, about a man who believes that good and evil exists in everyone and experiments to find them both, has inspired more than 10 movies and television programs. The Nutty Professor, released in 1963 starring Jerry Lewis and in 1996 starring Eddie Murphy, are two modern day versions of Stevenson's plot. You can read Stevenson's original story online courtesy of Bibiomania.

Moby Dick by Herman Melville
This popular novel by Melville was a perfect fit for the big screen. Released in 1956 starring Gregory Peck, the story of Ahab and his obsession for the whale that took his leg wasn't nominated for any awards, but is still considered a classic movie by all standards. To find out more about the movie that inspired Jaws, check out the IMDB site for Moby Dick. Thanks to the University of Virginia, you can read the entire novel without leaving your computer. You can also learn about The Life and Works of Herman Melville with this page devoted entirely to the author.

Lucky you! A list of classics that you don't even have to read. Just run down to your local video store and rent a classic today. But remember, despite all the awards these movies won, the book is always better.

 Advertisement


More to Explore

BookSpot
Book Reviews
Articles
Book Awards
Questions & Answers
Lists
Authors
Genres

Genres
Children's Books
Mystery
Poetry
Romance
Science Fiction

Related Spots
CinemaSpot.com
HomeworkSpot.com
LibrarySpot.com

Back to Home Page




s
s
Find more useful resources in popular areas of the StartSpot Network...
s
Today's Headlines
Film Festivals
Online Museums
State Government
Online College
Genealogy How-To
Find a University Science Fair Ideas
Bargain Travel
Dictionaries
Libraries
White Pages

s

© 1997-2016, StartSpot Mediaworks, Inc.
Advertising Information | Privacy Policy